• Pages

  • Launching Ultra Violet

    IT’S A TIME of intense and rapid change in India. Women are stretching their wings, exploring new spaces and testing the boundaries of old ones. With more women working, traveling, living on their own or managing high-powered careers, new challenges have emerged. Some women are coping with increased independence or living alone. Others are trying to find new ways of balancing work and home or to negotiate parenting and child care.

    Then again, in some ways, the country has not changed enough. The sex ratio remains abysmal and female foeticide is routine despite the laws banning sex-selective abortion. Dowry deaths are common. Violent, heinous crimes against women abound. Women across class, region and religion become victims to domestic violence, acid attacks, sexual assault and rape.

    Despite the onset of MTV culture in some areas, sexual rights remains an area shrouded in mystery and suspicion. Many women still do not have knowledge or awareness about their own bodies. Sex education is denied in schools and girls grow up largely ignorant of both the pleasures and the perils of sex. Alternative sexuality is still largely unacceptable and lesbians face horrifying levels of social stigma and discrimination.

    Ultra Violet will give voice to what young Indian feminists feel about life in these times. It will be an interactive space for us to discuss feminism in the context of its relevance to our lives. It will be a place where we talk about the things that are important to us — both in our personal lives and in the larger world around us — and the ways in which we can react, respond, negotiate or protest.

    We hope to be informative, enlightening, provocative, inspiring, and (sometimes!) fun. Do drop in.

    More about us here.

    Digg This Add to Del.icio.us Technorati This Stumble It!
    Advertisements

    7 Responses

    1. This is an admirable initiative and you deserve praise for conceptualising it and putting it in place.

      However, I am curious about the use of the adjective, “young”. I know about the theoretical need to consciously involve young women in the movement so that the legacy of feminism continues; is handed down to daughters and sisters.

      But I have always found the application of the word problematic, unnecessary and divisive. Does it mean that the struggles of young feminists are different from the struggles of old feminists? Do young feminists face issues/problems that refer specifically to their age? Isn’t this ageism of a kind? Is a new language and politics being created by the young feminists, which is radically different from the language and politics of old feminists? If the word “young” is being emphasised, then it also has to be addressed and perhaps the introductory posts should deal with questions like the ones above.

      Congratulations once again and may you go far!

    2. Yay!
      This is a significant space, and I’m glad some people are doing this!
      A lot of us have joined the blogging world because we wanted to articulate our experiences about being women in India,
      Thanks also to the Blank Noise project for leading the way, for me atleast.
      It’s about time we grew and diversified, brought together concerns and see change happen!
      Finally, let’s redefine discourses and practice what we preach!
      Much much power and with this all the way!

    3. Dear All,

      Congrats!!

      Would like to be informed on the views of the like minded on various aspects of lIFE through this initiative.

      looking forward to meaningful experience!!

    4. great to see this new blog! keep writing!

    5. @River
      Thank you and to answer your points quickly — Does it mean that the struggles of young feminists are different from the struggles of old feminists? …We think so.

      Do young feminists face issues/problems that refer specifically to their age? Again, yes.

      Isn’t this ageism of a kind? Focusing on one aspect sometimes means excluding others. But I don’t think exclusion of this type can be called ageism.

      Is a new language and politics being created by the young feminists, which is radically different from the language and politics of old feminists? I don’t know about radically different, but different yes.

      And you’re right, we will be addressing this in one of our posts. At the same time, we don’t want to get lost in the maze of explaining, justifying and defending our positions and fail to address the real issues out there. It’s a common trap that a lot of feminists fall into and we want to avoid that as much as possible.

      @Rahima
      Thanks Rahima and hope that you will keep visiting and add to the discussion.

      @Sam and Linda
      Thanks muchly for your kind words. Do come back.

    6. My prayers answered

      Just as I was lamenting the lack of feminist debate in India, here comes a collaborative blog–Ultra Violet–launched last week by a Bangalore-based women’s organisation, Hengasara Hakkina Sangha. Looking forward to reading it.

    7. In every persons attempt at understanding the human mind better, this blog definitely will prove to be a useful tool to understand the “Fairer sex” (or it is wrong to call you that??)

      And im sure besides being fantastic reading it will lead to some amount of social catharsis.
      All the best to the contributors! 🙂
      Cheers!

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: